SNYDERDEANJ
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See this image largerSee this image largerNessarose, queen of our little herd. (4 comments)See this image largerSee this image largerMore lettuce. See this image largerCucumber flower ... pretty little burst of yellow ... promise of fruit to come. See this image largerCutting lettuce at dawn. Going to food boxes for our area senior citizens. We all need to eat well. Mac and cheese is not enough. See this image largerPeas would be worth growing just to look at even if they weren’t nutritious and delicious. See this image largerStrawberries wanting more sun. Like the rest of us. See this image largerSalad mix. Drying under a fan after washing. Waiting for a splash of vinegar. See this image largerSalad mix. Drying under a fan after washing. Waiting for a splash of vinegar. See this image largerAnticipation...See this image largerEsterina cherry tomatoes. Already ripening on the esterina vine. A little flower promises more to come. See this image largerShallot scapes. Subtle sweet oniony garnish for salads and scrambled eggs. Our favorite scapes. See this image largerAbundance. See this image largerCucumbers. Onions. Growing together. See this image largerCucumbers. Onions. Growing together. See this image largerOnions. Cucumber. Sharing space. See this image largerRadishes love spring. See this image largerRed Tide loose leaf lettuce. Delicate. Tender. Rich. See this image largerPirat butterhead lettuce. Originally from German where it was called Sprenkel or Brauner Trotzkopf. Solid. Rich. See this image largerTaste of spring.See this image largerBaby white velvet okra plants. New to us, but been around for 100+ years. Just never made it into the chain supermarkets. We love okra. See this image largerGherkin on farmer’s hand. See this image largerIndigo cherry tomatoes. Soon. See this image largerBrandywine tomatoes. Heirloom. Monsters in the making. See this image largerBrandywines. Monsters in the making. See this image largerBrandywines. Monsters in the making. See this image largerBrandywines.See this image largerBrandywine.See this image largerBrandywine.See this image largerA couple of more weeks of these, hopefully. See this image largerAmish paste. Soon. See this image largerMoskivich tomato. See this image largerGarlic scapes. Pesto coming. See this image largerGarlic scapes. Pesto coming. See this image largerAdd luster to milder dishes. Summer savory has a spicy aroma and pungent, peppery flavor ... indispensable for kicking up mild foods without overpowering them. (From Spice Islands) See this image largerGarlic. Ready to harvest already! See this image largerGarlic. Ready to harvest already!See this image largerEggplant seedlingsSee this image largerHerb bed: clary sage, summer savory, marjoram, Greek oregano, parsley,dill, thyme, tarragon, rosemary, See this image largerSyrian smooth cucumber. Perfect for salad when about three inches long. Seed collected in Homs, Syria, in 1949 and given to the US Department of Agriculture. See this image largerSyrian smooth cucumber. Seed collected in Homs, Syria, in 1949 and given to the US Department of Agriculture, available today through the Truelove seed company in Philadelphia. Perfect for salads when about three inches long. See this image largerHeirloom Brandywine. First of the season. See this image largerSeminole pumpkin plant. Our favorite pumpkin. Grown from seeds we saved in 2016.See this image largerJune = squash and cukesSee this image largerJune = squash and cukesSee this image largerLast peas of spring. Hopefully there’ll be another spring and more peas next year. See this image largerWe’ve been eating potatoes we canned last year ... chemical free and they tasted great. But not as great as these new potatoes we dug up yesterday. Red Thumb fingerlings. See this image largerFinally ...See this image largerEsterina cherry tomatoes on the vine.See this image largerFirst okraSee this image largerOne of our pasture raised broilers ready for the table. See this image largerOkra bloomSee this image largerOopsSee this image largerGarlic harvest happening now. See this image largerGarlic harvest happening now. See this image largerOur second planting of summer squash in bloom. See this image largerPruden’s Purple tomato. They are actually pinkish in color. Lots of flavor. See this image largerPruden’s Purple tomato. Actually pinkish in color. Lots of flavor. See this image largerIko Iko pepper. Never found in supermarkets because the skin is too thin to ship across the country, but exceptional in salads! See this image largerIndigo Cherry DropsSee this image largerIndigo Cherry DropsSee this image largerLuffa flowerSee this image largerAbout ready...See this image largerRonde de Nice. A round French Zucchini squash. Harvest when it is somewhere between the size of a golf ball and a softball. Great taste. See this image largerSquash bloomSee this image largerSquash bloomSee this image largerSquash bloomSee this image largerSquash bloomSee this image largerBreakfast for a bee.See this image largerPruden’s purple heirloom tomatoes. Dates to the 19th century when “purple” was used to describe pink tomato color, one of my new favorites. See this image largerSee this image largerThe leaf of a Seminole pumpkin plant, our favorite pumpkin. The leaf is more than a foot in height and width with two shades of green in pattern. The entire vine is more than six feet long. Pumpkins are just beginning to form. See this image largerPurée from heirloom tomatoes. See this image largerBlossom of our favorite pumpkin ... the Seminole, a heritage pumpkin preserved by the Seminole tribe of Florida. A little pumpkin the size of a golf ball is forming behind the flower. See this image largerBeginning to take shape: our favorite pumpkin, the heirloom Seminole preserved by the Seminole tribe of Florida. See this image largerWe’ve been eating lots of summer squash this year. Last evening we had squash fritter and turmeric squash with tempeh for dinner. See this image largerOkra. Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites has a great bean gumbo recipe. See this image largerOnions and herbs on our stand at this morning%should farmers’ market. It was a good morning. See this image largerCanned potatoes yesterday. Red Thom and LaRatte fingerlings. See this image largerCanned potatoes yesterday. Red Thom and LaRatte fingerlings. They will make great home fries roasted in a little olive oil come winter. See this image largerCanned potatoes yesterday. Red Thom and LaRatte fingerlings. They will make great home fries roasted in a little olive oil come winter.See this image largerFavorite cherries tomatoes this year: black cherries. See this image largerFresh pulled Joe’s shallot, an old heirloom variety recently improved through selective breeding by the Fedco Seed Co. See this image largerOur Seminole pumpkins are beginning to ripen! Our very favorite pumpkin. See this image largerJoe’s Rounds. Peppers ripening. A local chef pickles these and serves them atop his antipasto salad. Hot but not extreme. Tangy. See this image largerOur Seminole pumpkins are ripe! Preserved by the Seminole tribe of Florida, this heirloom has the brightest orange, most flavorful flesh of any pumpkin we’ve tasted. See this image largerOur Seminole pumpkins are ripe! Preserved by the Seminole tribe of Florida, this heirloom has the brightest orange, most flavorful flesh of any pumpkin we’ve tasted. See this image largerSeminole pumpkin, roasted and baked.See this image largerSeminole pumpkin: roasted and baked. See this image largerHarvesting basil for pesto. See this image largerLuffas (or loofahs) growing on the vine. For when you want a bowl of chocolate ice cream but decide to take a bath instead. When young and tender, luffas can actually be eaten like squash, but when mature rubbing them where it hurts helps with arthritis pains. See this image largerLuffas (or loofahs) growing on the vine. For when you want a bowl of chocolate ice cream but decide to take a bath instead. When young and tender, luffas can actually be eaten like squash, but when mature rubbing them where it hurts helps with arthritis pains.See this image largerLuffas (or loofahs) growing on the vine. For when you want a bowl of chocolate ice cream but decide to take a bath instead. When young and tender, luffas can actually be eaten like squash, but when mature rubbing them where it hurts helps with arthritis pains.See this image largerLuffas (or loofahs) growing on the vine. For when you want a bowl of chocolate ice cream but decide to take a bath instead. When young and tender, luffas can actually be eaten like squash, but when mature rubbing them where it hurts helps with arthritis pains.See this image largerSome of our young hens at the table scraps bucket. We came here as day-old chicks on April 8 and are now just beginning to lay eggs. The ones in the front are blue Ameraucanas Who lay delicious blue or green eggs. See this image largerThe blue eggs and the one greenish one Are courtesy of our blue and golden ameraucana hens. See this image largerThese are a breed of chicken developed in the Czech Republic called GS902. They are a cross between Americaunas and white leghorns. GS stands for Green Shell Dominant ... they tend to lay green eggs. They are perhaps the feistiest chickens we’ve ever raised, but their eggs are beautiful, as are they. We got them as day-old chicks from Freedom Ranger Hatchery in Lancaster County, Pa. See this image largerThese are a breed of chicken developed in the Czech Republic called GS902. They are a cross between Americaunas and white leghorns. GS stands for Green Shell Dominant ... they tend to lay green eggs. They are perhaps the feistiest chickens we’ve ever raised, but their eggs are beautiful, as are they. We got them as day-old chicks from Freedom Ranger Hatchery in Lancaster County, Pa. See this image largerThese are a breed of chicken developed in the Czech Republic called GS902. They are a cross between Americaunas and white leghorns. GS stands for Green Shell Dominant ... they tend to lay green eggs. They are perhaps the feistiest chickens we’ve ever raised, but their eggs are beautiful, as are they. We got them as day-old chicks from Freedom Ranger Hatchery in Lancaster County, Pa.See this image largerLittle radishes growing in our garlic bed ... until we plant garlic there in early November. Hopefully, there’ll be some radishes to eat soon.

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