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SWEETENUFGILL's Photo SWEETENUFGILL Posts: 19,255
12/2/19 4:32 A

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I don't live in a place that gets VERY cold, but it still seems cold to me when it's frosty/icy - like this morning. My difficult areas to keep warm are fingers and toes.

Gill

Time Zone GMT (London) - yes, I'm hours ahead of most of you! Cornwall, UK

"...regardless of the short-term outcome, the very fact of your continuing to struggle is proof of your victory as a human being." Daisaku Ikeda

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LADYBUG166's Photo LADYBUG166 Posts: 629
11/29/19 7:20 P

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Dr. Miller’s Tips and Tricks for Exercising in the Cold
Layer up. There’s a reason this age-old advice to layer up keeps popping up: It works. Dr. Miller says dressing in thin, breathable layers is key to any successful cold-weather workout. “It is important to have all skin and appendages covered when going out to train in the cold, but the layers should not have you feeling overly warm or hot when you leave your house,” he says. “If you are going out for a run, your body will heat up and likely be sweating within just a few minutes, even if the temperature is below freezing.” As your body temperature rises, you can peel off external layers. Consider wearing a small sports backpack or cinch sack so you can stow articles of clothing as you shed them.
Use the wind to your advantage. If you’re headed outside for a chilly run, Dr. Miller suggests running into the wind at the beginning and then with the wind at your back on the way home. This allows you to minimize the amount of moisture (sweat) against your body, which helps to keep your body temperature from dropping. As a bonus, having the wind behind you provides a boost during the last portion of your run or workout, when your energy may be dwindling.
Be patient. Your first frigid fitness sessions may have you dreaming of a warm blanket and roaring fire, but they’ll likely become more bearable as you get used to the frosty temps. “Experienced elite-level athletes become acclimated to cold temperatures after extensive cold-weather training,” Dr. Miller points out.
Stay hydrated. Water is probably the last thing on your mind when you’re shivering your way through a snowy 5K, but experts agree that it’s still important to drink up in cold temperatures. Even if you don’t feel hot and sweaty, you’re still losing fluids that need to be replenished.

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